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Twitter’s revenue increases by more than £180 million in three years

Twitter recently passed its IPO documents to US regulators, and the figures show that the social media giant’s revenue was over £197 million at the end of 2013. This represents a massive increase – at the end of 2010 the company’s revenue was just £17 million. The impressive turnover, combined with Twitter’s intention to go public, shows that it’s never been more popular to consumers, and important to businesses.

Tellingly, 85 percent of Twitter’s revenue in 2012 came from advertising. Companies recognise that Twitter offers them access to a vast and international audience, and are willing to pay large sums to tap into this resource.

When you log into Twitter the presence of corporations isn’t limited to adverts, though. The social network provides a platform for companies to interact with their existing customers, as well as a huge number of potential clients – the site boasts some 218 million monthly users.

Twitter is now a crucial part of many companies’ digital marketing strategies, however it usually acts as a conduit to direct customers to your website rather than offering them products or services directly. For this reason, it’s vital to ensure that an active, sociable and professional social media approach is matched by an easy-to-use website. Layout and structure should be clear, and your web copy needs to be spot on – it should be engaging and to-the-point.

Twitter’s IPO documents also show that 65 percent of its advertising revenue in the first half of 2013 was generated from mobile. Mobile screens are small, so it’s even more important to keep your written communications, both on Twitter (which demands brevity) and your website, concise.

You can tweet us @strattoncraig to find out more about the importance of Twitter in modern marketing. If you’re interested in boosting the impact of your social media communications, or the quality of your digital copy, please get in touch with our team.

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