/ The origin of phrases

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The definition of Christmas

Rudolph Santa’s famous red-nosed helper, Rudolph the reindeer has always been portrayed as somewhat of an outcast. His name however, actually means ‘famous wolf’ and would have been an epithet given...

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The origin of phrases: Part nine

If you like nature, you’ll love these idioms. Actually that’s not strictly factual but hopefully you’ve landed here because you like language or history so at the very least it’s...

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The origin of phrases: Part eight

Even the most unmusical of us make reference to it in some common English phrases. It’s time to face the music with part eight of our ten-part series on the...

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The origin of phrases: Part seven

Could you utter a clothing-based idiom at the drop of a hat? In the seventh of our origin of phrases series, we talk hats, trousers and birthday suits. At the drop...

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The origin of phrases: Part six

So far (in parts 1-5) we’ve shared a wealth of randomly chosen idioms. For parts 6-9, we’ve decided to concentrate on categories. Part Six is ANIMALS… Make a beeline Meaning: Head...

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The origin of phrases: Part five

Five in, five to go. So far we’ve researched the origins of everything from the bee’s knees to the third degree. Be the envy of the pub quiz team with...

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The origin of phrases – Part three

If you follow @strattoncraig on Twitter you might’ve seen our post about the origins of ‘o’clock’…it’s below if you missed it, along with the history of a few other weird...

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The origin of phrases: Part four

We’ve studied the bee’s knees, got cold feet and painted the town red so far. Here are the origins of five more funny phrases… Treat it with kid gloves Meaning: Approaching a...

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The origin of phrases: Part two

Part One broke the ice and we hope it was up to scratch. This time round we’re hoping to be the flea’s eyebrows with part two of our series looking...

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The origin of phrases: Part one

Would you think twice if someone told you a bride at a wedding had got cold feet? Or if your friend started a difficult conversation by saying she wasn’t going...

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